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the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however,
right now at the $144 level. and when you think about it, rudy, this is the one network where science is really taken seriously. >> oh, yeah. i mean, you know, pbs is such a gift. it's a gift for the whole family. i love the science shows. i love "nova." i've been on "nova" several times. i love "nova science now." so many great shows. i mean, i think, we mainly watch pbs at home. my little girl loves "thomas the tank engine." and you know, where else can you get that? i mean, it's just the best--by far, the best network. >> so actually, public broadcasting is good for you. >> it actually is good for you. i mean, you know, if you're watching a rerun of "gilligan's island," you're not doing much for your brain, but if you're learning new stuff and you're making new synapses, which you can only get at pbs, you're actually doing a lot of good for yourself. you're creating--helping create your super brain. >> and you know what, rudy, you actually, in the package clearly at the $144--i love the notion of a user's manual because it's this idea--we all take our brains for granted, but what
that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted
like a lot and it sounds all too good to be true, but believe me, the science is there to back it up. as a neuroscientist, i can tell you that. so let's start. first, i'm going to tell you the single most important thing you need to know about how to create your super brain. simply put, you need to realize that you are not your brain. that's right. you are not your brain. you are the user of your brain. your brain serves you. you shouldn't be serving it. and this will be a recurring theme throughout this presentation. for now, our task is to think about how to age and at the healthiest way, keep our brains healthy, and that means how can we develop a super brain? let me that begin by telling you a little bit about your own brain. what you may not know is that one of the reigning ideas about how the brain is organized is the triune brain, meaning that the brain has three major parts, okay? so to demonstrate this, i'm going to use my hand. this is called the handy brain and this was developed by ucla neuropsychiatrist dan siegel the handy version of the brain. so put up your hand. okay
and ph.d. from science from this institution, and a and philosophy from the hebrew university in jerusalem and a b.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz, who i feel silly introducing these people would still, have to. norman paul ha'aretz served as editor-in-chief from commentary magazine from 1960 to 1995, and as the current editor-at-large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow with hudson institute, and he was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles including the bush doctrine, with the president said, and what it means in world war iv, the longest struggle against the islamofacism coming and why are jews liberals which for the new criterion is really entitled why are jews still liberals? she was a pulitzer prize scholar at columbia university where he earned his bachelor's of arts in 1950, and he also holds a bachelor's and master's degree from cambridge university england where she was a fulbright scholar and a fellow. in addition he has a bachelor's degree in hebr
science-fiction but increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is ageing faster than any in the world. over 3 million people suffer from senile dementia. nursing staff and facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop researchers are building new and intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this old people's home in yokohama city, south of tokyo. the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they are recognized as medical equipment. ironically, care-giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans, but the situation may be chan
eyes stay fixed on the clock. >>> japanese robots that look after the elderly, it sounds like science fiction, but it's increasingly science fact. and with good reason. japanese society's aging faster than any in the world. over three million people suffer from see nile dementia. nursing staff and facilities are stretched past capacity. researchers are building new and humane intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this home south of tokyo. the robot works the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they recognize the medical equipment. ironically, care giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans. but the situation may be
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
--- science is backkng thaa up.the american academy of pediatrics says recess is day and stresses it should ol - punishment. the time is esseettal for kids echarging their rains.and because kids lives are áso ssrrctured poday... unstructured ...ásupervisedá play is important for creativity and poeeall wel being. it was a year of zany antics on sports fields across the glo. globe.we take a look at some of 2012's most mmeorable sports bloopers. blooperr. iffyoo're nursing a hangover wassing yyur time.we're o help 3 separating hangover cure fact from fiitiin. dehydration and is often y behind the morning- after peeling. one of the best things you can do to cure a hangover is to drink plenty of . water.myth # 2. take pain hangover and can havv a tion. dangerous interrction with the alcohol in your system. system..yyh # 3. eat while foods work best.. food slows 3 pest.myth # 4. drink cafffine: fiction. it will wake yoo up any quicker. quicker.mytt # 5. sleep it off: fact. ttme nd rest are some of the best hangover currs. the nee year iss here... anndnow... it's timm to put all that talk about
solution," is that you've kind of thought of everything. from the cooking dvds to the background science to the recipes to the success journal to every little element that somebody's gonna need so they don't feel lost, but one of the fun things is you've just come up, i have your old one, but this is the new refrigerator magnet that you've created now with the wheel, not with the pyramid, and i can't tell you how many times i have faced my refrigerator and seen you in front of my refrigerator and instead of going into the freezer and getting some ice cream, i go in and get a handful of raw almonds and get just as satisfied and feel a whole lot better. this is one of those fun little things, but it actually does help. >> right, well, you're gonna get that refrigerator magnet which has the food plate on it. and it's gonna--you're gonna know that how to structure with just one quick look, how to structure your daily meal plan. and you know what? everything supports and reinforces the other, because people need all this information. you know, when you have incomplete inforon, you get incompl
revolutionized or reimagined seven industries. he did it, isaacson says, by standing at the crossroads of science and the humanities, connecting creativity with technology, and combining leaps of imagination with feats of engineering to produce new devices that consumers hadn't even thought of. >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. >> if you had to pick a day where it all came together, january 9, 2007, is not a bad one. jobs is in san francisco at the macworld conference in full pitchman mode as he unveils his latest product to the faithful. >> these are not three separate devices. this is one device. [cheers and applause] and we are calling it iphone. >> it is not only a remarkable achievement but a validation of everything that jobs believed in: if you made and controlled all of your own hardware and all of your own software, you could integrate all of your products and all of your content seamlessly into one digital hub. and no one but steve jobs had thought of it. >> this is something microsoft couldn't do 'cause it made software but not the hardware. it's so
lara, afternoon highs, -- the new year's celebration is taking place. the science center held the balloon drop for little ones, the chance to ring in the new year without staying up past your bedtime. it was time to celebrate the stroke of midnight at 11:00 a.m ., and 4 p.m. we'll see you the next time the news breaks. our coverage continues at the 10:00 news. for the countdown to 2013. here's the new year's r esolution. ♪ [ female announcer ] no more paper coupons. no more paper lists. [ dog barking ] ♪ no more paper anything. safeway presents just for u. ♪ save more. save easier. saving more, starts now. just for u on the safeway app.
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
rate of spending were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thoughtht i would show you wht thuld happen if we change into thspeaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $1
are more diabetic and fatter. the i can all be fixed with good science. john: you have a book called "good calories, bad calories." but i know that a calorie is a calorie. >> the reason we get thats because we take in more energy than we expected. it becomes a unit of heat. protein, fat, the different types of carbohydrates, the glucose from fructose sugar, they all have different effects. whether or not you will store calories as fat order there will not the calories come up with a hormonal effects of the food. how much energy bring to us. john: but the u.s. department of health says a calorie is a calorie. >> it just hasn't been tested. one of the things we did when i started this organization. john: this being? >> the nutritionist study. we went back to world war ii to every scientist that attempted to answer that question. we foun 82 studies that have attempted to answer that. they were all probably the same limitations and prlems. in 2012, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence. a calorie is not a calorie, necessarily. john: one thing that absolutely must be true if you should eat less
to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. it's oscar mayer. >>> still to come on this new year's day, a duet from colbie caillat and gavin degraw. >> and out on the rink. >> after your local news and weather. strength and determination are human too. so are dinner dates and birthday cake. introducing the new weight watchers 360 program. built for human nature so you can expect amazing. ♪ on top of the world right now ♪ join for free and expect amazing. because it works. you know you could just use bengay zero degrees. medicated pain relief you store in the freezer. brrr...see ya boys. [ male announcer ] new bengay zero degrees. freeze and move on. >> this is wbal-tv 11 news and a baltimore. >> rain passes to our south. sprinkle out and baltimore, mostly cloudy skies. temperatures hover into the 40's in the afternoon. mountains, 30's an
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of everyace are thrown togeth in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" whe it s banas tchi that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the republican strategy
carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered from the christmas eve heist are worth over $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square but folks in lisburn, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve the town drops yellow britches in honor of the yellow breeches creek. creative. >>> organizers in southern california applied the finishing touches to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go. you can watch that entire parade on nbc. >>> in nebraska, folks have a unique way of getting rid of the holiday, treat the fruitcake. the fruitcake filleting. people of all ages jumps at the chance, nice arm, to chuck the unwanted christmas gifts. >>> now for entertainment news. what's the new year without a psy update? he rang in the new year at times square telling jay gray he might be ready to move on from gangnam style. >> i cannot just, you know, stay here. i got to move forward. i'm working on a new thing. but if i keep doing this and
. >> host: political science professor steven frantzich, the most recent book "oops: observing our politicians stumble," i had to double check that. how many books have you written? what's the topics? >> guest: well, this is 17 of original books, start counting the second editions, it's 27, but always lie with statistics. i started out all academic, time in the trenches, doing academic books, textbooks, last five or six books are more fun kinds of books. the one just prior to this, i did one called honored guests profiling all of the people, the presidents mentioned in the state of the union message. today, we're used to that, a president pointing up and using it somewhat as app example. that was not done until roomed reagan did it for the first, you know, for the first time, and every president since then used the people as an example of their political goals and their sorts of philosophies so i had fun with that one. close to home, i did a bigg of brian lamb. i did work, and they said what is the real brine lamb like? he did not want a biography done. i pumped him and pumped him,
tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions they do not cover the holes in the law where san francisco would be liable and 9th circuit has heard by far the majority of the cases 190, cases that is 27.4 percent of all federal cases. >> thanks. >> national population. >> thank you. >> finally. >> could you share with us your 5 and 6 briefly. >> yes, thank y
famous architect has designed the california academy of sciences, the wonderful building in golden gate park. he has also designed similar museum in italy in my city and the museum is almost finished there, and our ambition is to have him come over and celebrate at the academy, and also talk to young architects about the most sustainable ways to build this century. other questions? if there is no other question i thank you so much. thank our distinguished guest for being here with us and i hope to have a good time with you guys at the italian cultural institute. thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. this is our disaster council meeting of october 26. thank you all for coming. welcome to our emergency operations center. as you know we generally meet at city hall but today is a very special day that you will learn about as we unfold our agenda and thank you again for coming. i'm going to turn the table over to mayor lee who is going to give some opening remarks. >> thank you. good afternoon everyone and welcome to our turk street emergency operations center. first of all
and poems. located near the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings.
connected to the stealing of 100 unique meteorites. loaned to a north carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered in the christmas eve heist are worth more than $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square, but the folks in lisbon, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve, the town drops these yellow britches in honor of the yellow britches creek. i get it. it's funny. >>> and finally, organizers in is south carolina put the tip theiring toughs to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go and you can watch the entire parade right here on nbc. >>> now to sports. let's get started with college football. good appetite yesterday. clemson down to the kick. time's running out, it's good. clemson upsets number 8 lsu. 25-24. in the sun bowl, georgia tech wins over usc. and the music city bowl, jordan rodgers ran for another score. and the commodores beat north carolina state. to the liberty bowl, three touchdowns beat iowa state 31-17. t
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. th ink it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. o0 c1 if we can stay at or above 14 degrees at midnight tonight this will go down as the warmest year in chicago history. these records have been kept since 1871. we have that record nailed time lapse pictures you are looking at a lot of... over chicago today these are rather ominous looking clouds. we dropped to 21 degrees at this moment a few spots out to the west. temperatures now that the cold front has passed will be up to monitor. wind speeds coming out of the north in the 5-15 mi. per hour range. already feeling like single-digit lows this area of the southern midwest is a winter weather advisory. the pinkish red area out through kansas is the winter storm warnings 5-8 in
money in your january tax rates. >> this is an enact science. how much longer could this go on? how much longer could we wait for the house to vote? >> reporter: we are going over the cliff. they can do some stuff so that big pay tax rate increases won't kick in. they kicked it down a couple months. we will be talking about this for weeks, months. >> thank you. >>> despite the uncertainty over the fiscal cliff stocks rallied this year. that could change on wednesday depending on what happens tomorrow. the dow is up 166 to 13,104. >>> while there is still no deal on the fiscal cliff lawmakers reached an agreement to keep milk prices from going up. we are waiting on the house to vote on it. if they don't do it before midnight it defaults back to a 1949 statute. the government would be forced to buy milk at twice today's price. >>> the united states hit its debt limit today, borrowing $16.4 trillion. the treasury department is taking measures to buy time till february. after that the treasury will not be able to pay bills in full and own time setting the stage for another fight on capitol h
rate of spding were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking forereign language] eart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... announcer: this song was s created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio.. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i wod show youwhat thuld happen if wechange into the speaker boehner plan,
. >> in the summer of 1991, they had breakfast with the washington correspondent for " the christian science monitor," and he has this regular meeting with politically important people with a bunch of reporters present, and they raise the issues of the rumors, and hillary clinton says, "i want you all to know that we have had lot -- trouble in our lives as a married couple, but we love each other. we believe in each other. i love my husband, and we are going to stay together for the rest of our lives," and they are blown away by her commitment. what they do not know is that this is a dress rehearsal, because nine months later, when bill is soaring in the polls, almost on top of the new hampshire primary, a senator from massachusetts, the next door state, at that moment, jennifer flowers says that she has said a 12-year love affair with bill clinton and has the tape recordings to prove it. >> and professor on how the clintons had their relationship benefit their political ambitions. this is continuing four days of nonfiction books and authors through new year's day on c- span's booktv. >> neil armstr
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. avoid bad.fats. don't go over 2000... 1200 calories a day. carbs are bad. carbs are good. the story keeps changing. so i'm not listening... to anyone but myself. i know better nutrition when i see it: great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more processed flakes look nothing like naturalrains. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. for multi grain flakes tt are anxcellent source of fiber try great grains banana nut crunch and cranberry almond crunch. >> bret: this is a fox news alert. live in washington. bret baier live in washington. you can tell it is getting a little late after a long day of covering fiscal cliff coverage here as the deal appears to be heading in the right direction. although vice president biden is meeting with senate democrats and has been for the last hour and a half trying to twist arms and possibly get votes as a piece o
she has a ph.d. in something. political science i think and i think charles murray would be gummy probably would not want to be called the pundit. he is famous for the controversy over the bell curve but this is a book that looks at the white working class and looked at the white working class to try to separate class from race which complicates everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class has gone down hill and there is this sort of white elite adopts a middle-class and sort of a complex argument. he goes to two places to describe these things. is inching and provocative book so more than someone is ranting and raving. >> host: and of course -- with the american enterprise institute so not fair to call him a political pundit. what about glenn beck? he launched his own imprint but his flock show is off the air. can you see the results in his sales? >> guest: as far as i can tell, glenn beck, what he has been doing since he left fox's has been really trying to build a brand that reaches a dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio sh
behind are hundreds of orphaned elephants. our contributing science correspondent m. sanjayan of the nature conservancy found a woman who has devoted her entire life to helping them at an elephant sanctuary in kenya. >> reporter: these orphaned elephants are getting a second chance at life thanks to their foster mother, dame daphne sheldrick. >> we tried to replicate what that baby elephant would have in the wild, the most important thing being a family. >> reporter: sheldrick has lived among elephants nearly 60 years and started the orphanage in the 1970s when killing elephants for their tusks became an international crisis. over the years, she has discovered elephants share many traits with humans: a long life-span, mourning of their dead and strong family bonds. that's led to new techniques for raising elephants in captivity. >> so we have a team of keepers that represents the elephant family that they've lost. and here in the nursery, the keepers or attendants are with the little orphans 24 hours a day because a baby elephant in a natural situation would never ever be left
to be a lot tougher than it needs to be. whatever, science, history will all be harder. maybe you get to nap without reading and maybe not. if your kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about looks, the great and terrific thing is there's so many really good books out there for them to read. there's a lot of books that will absolutely blow the minds of your kid. you know, harry potter, terrific series. when the kids come and terrific illustrations. books about sports, fine. if you have boys, let them read anything. , looks, great, graphic novels, almanacs, cut books, share, why not. as long as they are reading because to get better at it. i'll go to schools and say who play soccer? who love soccer? the outcome of the. you better know? would play a lot. same with reading. he read more, get better at it. it gets easier. you read better books. you have something that you love. so i though the will to get that in your hands
, the deadline from. while the specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able
sciences, engineering and art that has given birth to perhaps more game makers and changers than any other place in the real world and was the home of -- >> find the best in everybody. >> mike: professor randy palm whose last lecture became a phenomenon. it was a viral inspiration to millions but he was an inspiration to the smiths long before that. >> from the beginning of us starting this company he said "you guys really have something here. you have something unique. and keep developing that. keep making a-- make the best company you can possibly make and shoot for the stars." >> mike: shooting for the stars. they can do that. >> it will take you a long time to design a square head on this guy. >> yeah. >> mike: it's no secret that the new media-- both the internet and digital devices-- has taken a large bite out of the newspaper and magazine businesses. but there are some notable exceptions. we'll take you now to one company that is determined not to let the sun set on old media. it is doing more than just scratching for chicken feed in the media barnyard. it is planting the seeds of n
are the incompatibility of the portrayal in the movie with basic science raises a point that mark describes it that the synoptic gos members, matthew, mark, luke and john, do not suggest the basis for the extreme, the savagery that we see in the motion picture, correct? >> not at all. you can really only find one lines in the gospels about jesus being lashed and whipped. and all that scourging that we see in the film and that takes about 45 minutes in the movie. >> spell that out a little bit. in matthew there is mention of being scourged before taken to the hill, that is the arduous process to get there, he was crowned with thorns, he was spit upon or smote or hit on the head. >> we certainly don't get a sense of the violence that attends the trial and the execution of jesus. we don't get that in the gospels at all. >> there's no mention -- let me clarify, there's no mention of scourging in john. and that brings us to another interesting question that we can raise with you and we're joined on the live line and he's actually been listening to us and he may choose to comment on what you've s
science correspondent robert bazell joins me now. bob, walk us through exactly what happened with this blood clot and how dangerous is it? >> reporter: this is a blood clot right behind the ear, right there. in a vein that's very close to the brain. you can see it on a red dot there, where there's a blockage, in a vein that drains blood from the brain. this is not common and not usually the result of a concussion. typically people get clots on the brain itself, and those can't be treated with anti coagulants, but this can be safely cleared away with drugs. the big danger is, if it weren't dissolved, it could grow and cause a stroke. according to her doctors, she has no evidence of the neurological damage that would have resulted from a stroke. >> the doctors are saying she'll recover completely. any idea how long she might be in the hospital? >> reporter: well, kate, experts who are not involved tell me if the treatment is successful, the patient often leaves the hospital within a few days. typically patients need to take it easy for several weeks. but doctors say there is no
science correspondent robert bazell is at columbia university hospital. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. she has a blood clot just below her ear on a blood vessel that drains blood from the brain but critically, it's not in the brain itself, which makes a difference in the prognosis. it's still a dangerous situation. you can see where the red dot there is on the diagram. it's being dissolved with blood thinners and over a period of days and all indications are that she will make a complete recovery. this is a dangerous situation, but she's going to be fine. andrea? >> good news. happy new year to you as well. thank you, robert. >>> now to the weather. scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely today throughout the southeast and gulf coast. some areas may receive over an inch of rain. isolated snow showers through the ohio valley and into the virginias with one to three inches of snow. snow. and heavier amounts over higher elevations. much of the country remains quite chilly with temperatures below average and partly cloudy conditions through the western united states. that's a look
a great teacher of mine who lived in bulgaria. he was an initiatic science teacher, and his lecture was very profound, and i wrote these words after listening to one of his recorded lectures. he said, the ideal of the soul, the thing it asks for is neither knowledge nor light, nor happiness. the ideal of the soul is space, immensity. the one thing your soul needs is to be free, free to expand and reach out and to embrace the infinite. yes, the ideal of the soul is infinity. it is miserable when it is circumscribed and restricted. it is a fragment of the universal soul which is infinite. that's what i speak about here in this program. the need to move beyond just fitting in, the need to move past being circumscribed, the soul does not like when you get fenced in, when it is told what to do, when it's told it has limitations, when it's told it can't become that. and so many of us go through our life with these enormous limitations that we've placed upon ourselves that have been handed to us from the time that we were little boys and little girls. if you look on the
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> three big names. a scandal in tabloid headlines. each told me their sordid stories, only one had me actually fearing for my safety. here sr. an interview like none i'd ever done before and i hope i don't have the to again. my conversation with robert blake. do you remember the night that she died well or is it now something you've blocked out of your head? >> no. i remember it quite well. >> you went and had dinner at this restaurant. >> where are you going? >> i'm interested in what happened. >> no, you're not interested. . what are you doing? what the hell are you doing? >> let me help you. there's no one talking to me. okay? you haven't got a worry. there's nobody talking to me. these are my questions for you which are based in my view -- >> now you want to know what happened that night? >> i'm curious, yeah. >> no, you're not curious. >> i am. because you were acquitted. >> i thought you said you researched all this, so you know what happened that night. >> ip know about the facts of the night. >> what? tel
bombshelters and worried about missal gaps, science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been prolonged. it was going on. nobody could really see an end to it.n there were all of the under lying risks of nuclear confrontation at the time. >> the next step in that race, manned launches that required a few good men, seven to start. >> there was 110 originally people selected by the air force and the navy to become astronauts. it widdled down to 32 after the interviews and things like that, 32 that went to the clinic. i was the only guy to flunk. >> how come you didn't pass the mercury physicals? >> i had what was known as a high bilirubin which is a pigment in your blood. with that they said, well, you are out. >> you said at a time when you were a little boy you can be with the dinasaurs or the -- you can be into dinasaurs or rockets. >> when i didn't get into the per ruer key -- mercury program i said i was interested in rockets before those guys could spell it. >> projectco mercury began in 1958 with the goals of putting a human in orbit and doing so before the soviets did. o
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